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SCS 19| Twelve Steps of Bread Baking

SCS Episode 19 The Twelve Steps Of Bread

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In this episode of The Stella Culinary School Podcast we discuss the twelve steps of the bread baking process.

Links and Information:

Recommended Books For Further Study

Also, check out this beautiful speech that Peter Reinhart gave at TedX concerning the 12 steps of bread.

 


 

For our complete list of audio lectures you can view The Stella Culinary School Podcast Index. For a list of video techniques, please visit our How To Cook Video Index. You can also subscribe to the Stella Culinary School Podcast feed through traditional RSS or iTunes.


 

How to Make a Basic Baguette | Video Recipe


This video will teach you how to make a great baguette in almost any oven.


Standardized Recipe
 


Tools Used In This Video

Further Information You Might Find Helpful

This post is part of our ongoing Bread Baking Video Series, which teaches a wide array of baking techniques and recipes. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

How To Roast Beets | Video

Beets are one of my favorite food products to work with during fall and winter. They are extremely versatile, come in all different shapes and sizes, and have an earthiness that just screams “winter comfort food.” Although there are many different ways to prepare and serve beets, one of my favorites, and most classical methods, is roasting.

To Roast Beets:

  • Start by wrapping each beet individually in foil and then group by size.

  • Roast in a 500 F/260 C oven until you can easily poke a wooden skewer into the center. (For approximate roasting times, see below).

  • Once beets are done roasting, let cool in foil until cold enough to easily handle.

  • Unwrap the foil and peel off the beet skin by rubbing with a clean kitchen towel until the skin is completely removed.

  • Note: If peeling different colored beets at the same time, start by peeling the lightest colored beet and working your way up to the darkest, (the red beet). This will prevent the darker beets from staining the lighter beets.

  • Note #2: When handling red beets, it’s advisable that you wear plastic gloves so you won’t stain your hands, and be conscious that the beet will stain just about anything it comes into contact with.

Approximate Roasting Times For Beets @ 500 F/260 C Oven

  • Baby Beets (Golf Ball Size):  0:45 min-1:30 hours

  • Medium Beets (Baseball Size): 1:30-2 hours

  • Large Beets (Softball Size): 2-2:30 hours

  • Note: These times are just approximations and everyone’s oven is different. For true accuracy, use these times as a guideline and check for desired tenderness with a wooden skewer.

OK, Now What?

Now that you’ve successfully roasted and peeled your beets, here are some ideas of what you can do with them.

  • Dice up and use as a salad garnish.

  • Beets go great with cheese, especially Goat Cheese, Gorgonzola, Ricotta and Queso Fresco.

  • Beets also go great with Dijon Mustard, Sea Salt, Walnuts, and Tarragon.

  • Try combining some of the flavors and ingredients from above, and adding your own spin on presentation and flavor structure.

 

For more posts like this, check out our ongoing Kitchen Prep Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.

 

How To De-Seed A Pomegranate | Video



This video will teach you how to quickly de-seed a pomegranate.

For more posts like this, check out our ongoing Kitchen Prep Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.

How To French Frog Legs


Frenching frog legs is a right of passage in many French kitchens. This video will teach you how to prep and french frog legs, allowing for a cleaner presentation and easier consumption.


For more posts like this, check out our ongoing Kitchen Prep Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.

What is the Baker's Percentage? | Video



This video will explain and demonstrate the baker's percentage.
What is the baker's percentage?
Below is a chart that illustrates traditional ratios for common types of bread dough.
What is the baker's percentage? Hydration & Ingredient Chart

Further Information

This post is part of our ongoing Bread Baking Video Series, which teaches a wide array of baking techniques and recipes. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

 

How To Make A Stabilized Beurre Blanc Using Xanthan Gum | Video



This video will teach you how to make a stabilized beurre blanc using Xanthan Gum.

More Resources
This post is part of our ongoing Sauces & Soups Video Series. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

How To Make A Chicken Roulade | Video Technique



There's an old joke that goes something like this:

Healthy Person: How do you cook a boneless, skinless chicken breast but actually make it taste good; you know, like not dry?

Chef: Well, first you start with about two pounds of butter....

While I make no claims that this is a "healthy recipe," it is no doubt one of the best ways to prep and cook a boneless, skinless chicken breast. This is due in large part to brining the breast and then pounding it out, which inherently will make it more tender. 

To make the brine mixture, weigh out enough cold water to completely cover the amount of chicken breasts you plan on turning into roulades. Multiply the weight of the water by .05 (5%) and add that amount in salt, whisking to dissolve. For example, if the water weight is 1000g, your equation would look like this: 1,000g X .05 = 50g Salt.

Brine chicken breasts overnight in refrigerator; 12 hours is good, 24 is better. Remove chicken breast from brine, rinse under cold running water and pat dry with paper towels.

Using a sharp knife, slit the sides of a gallon zip top bag as shown in the photos below. Lightly moisten the chicken breast with cold water to keep it from sticking to the bag and place breast inside the bag, skin side down.
how to make a chicken roulade 1
Using glancing blows, pound the thickest portion of the chicken breast with the textured side of a meat mallet until it starts to break down and flatten. As the breast becomes thinner, flip the meat mallet over and use the non-textured side to "fine tune" the breast, pounding it as thin and wide as possible without actually tearing the flesh.
how to make a chicken roulade 2
Place the pounded chicken breast skin side down on top of a long sheet of plastic wrap and inlay your filling of choice; here we're using provolone, prosciutto di parma and caramelized onions.
how to make a chicken roulade 3
Roll pounded chicken breast around your roulade filling, and then tightly wrap in plastic wrap.
how to make a chicken roulade 4
Grab ends of plastic wrap as shown in photos below, and use a counter twisting motion to form the roulade into a tight cylinder. Once the cylinder forms, roll the roulade on your work surface, pushing it away from you in rapid motions, while still holding the plastic wrap ends. Repeat this motion a few times until the plastic wrap builds tension and the roulade is noticeably tight.
how to make a chicken roulade 5
Tie off both ends while taking care to not release any tension created in the previous step.
how to make a chicken roulade 6
Poach in water that is just below a simmer (180ºF/82ºC) for 18-20 minutes. Remove from poaching liquid and chill in an ice bath.
how to make a chicken roulade 7
These roulades can be served either hot or cold, but are best if first chilled and then reheated with a secondary cooking process. Currently at Stella we will prep, poach and chill the roulades before service and then tempura fry to give a crisp outer coating while bringing back the core temperature. The tempura batter also has the added benefit of keeping the cheese and other fillings from melting out during the reheating process.

The chicken roulade entree that we're currently serving at Stella will be featured in an upcoming Completed Dish Video.

Related Posts

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For more posts just like this, check out our ongoing Kitchen Prep Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.
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